23 and me

16 Oct

In my previous post I provided an overview of the council’s proposal for redrawing ward boundaries and distributing council seats ahead of the 2022 election.

If the council’s scheme is approved there will be 66 councillors representing 23 wards – 20 of which will elect three councillors each and 3 will elect two.

Let’s take a look at the 23 wards in turn, starting with the new Stratford wards:

Stratford East Village

This is basically the northern half of the current Stratford and New Town ward, covering the East Village development, Westfield shopping centre, the International station and a chunk of older housing on the streets between Leyton Road and Leytonstone Road. It is projected to have an electorate of around 11,500 and will return three councillors. The preponderance of new, more affluent voters living in the apartment buildings of the East Village will make this a tempting target for both the Liberal Democrats and Greens. Indeed, the Lib Dems have submitted their own proposal for an ‘Olympic ward’ covering the East Village, but excluding the older ‘New Town’ area east of Leyton Road.

Stratford Olympic Park

The southern part of the current Stratford and New Town ward, including the London Stadium and the shopping centre, stretching south to Three Mills. It will also take in streets south of Forest Lane and west of Water Lane that are currently in Forest Gate South. The new ward will have 12,600 electors represented by three councillors.

Canning Town

Such has been the pace of development south of the Canning Town flyover that a new three-member ward can be created from the small area bounded by Newham Way, the Jubilee Line, Victoria Dock Road, Munday Road and Radland Road. This compact ward will hold 11,300 voters. As with the East Village, this ward may be an opportunity for someone to break Labour’s complete stranglehold on the council. 

Canning Town North

Slightly reduced version of the current ward, but retaining three councillors. Bounded to the north by the District line/C2C railway and to the south by the A13, it takes in West Ham station, the Memorial Ground, Eastlea and Rokeby schools and Rathbone Market. 12,500 voters.

Victoria Dock

This new ward is made up of the western half of the current Royal Docks ward, plus a bit of the old Canning Town South. It will include the whole of the community in Silvertown and Britannia Village on the south of the Royal Victoria Dock. Its northern boundary captures the new developments around the DLR line. Victoria Dock will have 8,500 voters and elect two councillors.

Albert Dock

The other, eastern half of the current Royal Docks, taking in City Airport, the North Woolwich community and the developments around Gallions Reach. The council notes that the boundary between this and Beckton could be problematic due to future developments. It suggests the Boundary Commission may want to take a further look, so this ward may yet change. As currently proposed, its 8266 electors will be represented by two councillors.

Plaistow West

That the council has suggested Canning Town East as an alternative name for this ward tells you a lot about where it is. This new ward is bounded by the A13 to the south and the District line the north, with Plaistow High Street/Greengate Street to the east. Hermit Road and the East London cemetery mark the western edge. The Greenway slices through the ward from east to north-west. 11,673 voters will elect three councillors.

Plaistow North

This ward most obviously breaks the council’s own rules about ‘impermeable boundaries’. The District line splits it in two and there is only one crossing point to move from the southern to the northern half. The southern part sits between Plaistow High Street/Greengate Street and Green Street (up to and including Queens Market), north of Barking Road. The northern portion is south of Plashet Road, to either side of Stopford Road. The three councillor ward holds 11,300 voters.

Plaistow South

A rejigged version of the current ward, taking in part of the old Canning Town South ward, so that its western boundary is now New Barn Street. It takes in the area between Barking Road and the A13, with Prince Regent Lane running more or less through the middle. The south east quarter of the ward covers Newham University Hospital, Cumberland School and Newham Leisure Centre. It’s 11,300 electors will be represented by three councillors.

Custom House

Although there is an existing Custom House ward, it is quite different to the one proposed by the council. It takes in the eastern half of the Old Canning Town South and the western half of the current Custom House. The A13 provides the northern boundary and the Excel Centre sits to the south. To the north east the council has opted not to use Beckton District Park as a boundary and therefore residents around Sheerwater Road and Fulmer Road will find themselves in Beckton ward rather than Custom House. This 12,600 voter ward will return three councillors.

Beckton

The geographically largest ward in the borough is mostly unaltered, bar the changes with Custom House mentioned above and a small number of properties going into the new Albert Dock ward. With 12,729 voters returning three councillors, Beckton is at the outer edge of acceptable electoral variance (+9%).

Boleyn

This densely populated ward covers the area north and south of the old West Ham football ground – now a new housing development. There are some small boundary changes from the existing ward, which ‘improve electoral equality’. Just over 11,000 electors and three councillors.

West Ham

No changes from the current boundaries. 10,800 voters, electing three councillors.

Forest Gate South

Apart from the loss of a few streets west of Water Lane to the new Stratford Olympic Park ward, Forest Gate South remains unchanged. Water Lane now forms a distinct boundary between Forest Gate and Stratford. FGS retains three councillors, who will be elected by around 11,500 voters.

Forest Gate North

No changes to this three councillor ward, which is home to 11,329 electors.

Green Street West

Another ward with no changes. With just 10,600 voters and three councillors it is at the margin of acceptable electoral variation (10%). The council says it is difficult to identify changes that would improve this.

Green Street East

Remains within unchanged boundaries. It’s electoral variance is -9% (10,695 voters and three councillors) 

Manor Park

Popcorn time for Labour watchers. This ward is reduced in size with properties furthest from the centre moving to Little Ilford and Plashet wards, leaving just 8,300 electors. As a result, it will only have two councillors and one of the current three will have to look elsewhere for a seat. 

Little Ilford

Unchanged, bar the addition of First Avenue and streets to the east, and a section of Romford Road from Manor Park. The reconfigured three-councillor ward will have 12,200 voters.

Plashet

The ward previously known as East Ham North gains a few properties from Manor Park (Monega Road and parts of Shrewsbury Road and High Street North), but is otherwise unchanged. 12,150 voters with three councillors.

East Ham

The new name for East Ham Central. This ward covers the area either side of the High Street, south of the District line and encompasses the main shopping area, the old Town Hall and Central Park. To improve ‘electoral equality’ there are some minor changes to the boundary with Burges ward (or Wall End, as it is currently known). East Ham ward will have 11,770 voters and three councillors.

East Ham South

The ward takes in a few streets on its western boundary from Boleyn, but is otherwise unchanged. It covers the residential areas either side of High Street South down to the A13. It is projected to contain 11,791 voters and will be represented by three councillors.

And finally…

Burges

The current Wall End ward, with the addition of Keppel Road, Streatfield Road, Latimer Road and Altmore, plus properties on the north side of Barking Road east of Keppel Road (all from East Ham Central). I have no idea why Burges is a better name than Wall End for this ward – does it have some local significance? 11,500 Burges-ites will have three councillors representing them.

3 Responses to “23 and me”

  1. Kronikal October 28, 2019 at 10:16 #

    I’m disappointed that this post (& the last) is worded to give the overall impression, despite caveats at the beginning, that the council’s plan is what is expected to happen, that it’s all a formality & that the LBN plan will likely just get rubber-stamped. This feeds the long-established narrative that there’s no point wasting time disagreeing with the council, as they do as they want. You do mention the LibDems’ proposal for an Olympic ward, but mostly it’s a case of what “will” happen, rather than “would”.

    In fact, this is part of a multi-stage consultation by the Local Government Boundary Commission for England, who are about to publish their *provisional* plan for Newham, based on council population data and the responses from a variety of people/organizations. You make no mention of these (see https://www.lgbce.org.uk/all-reviews/greater-london/greater-london/newham – then click on 3), such as the many which say there should be a Maryland ward. You pointed out that the council doesn’t want single-member “micro” wards. You don’t mention Newham Labour’s self-interest in wanting to keep the wards as large as possible, as any small area of the borough with the temerity to spurn Labour at a council election will be swamped by the overall Lab majority in a larger ward containing it, thus returning 3 Labour councillors rather than a more representative selection.

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